Near the end of 2020, a bunch of musicians populating a chatroom, including myself, each submitted ten minutes’ worth of our work to another musician, Chimeratio, who generously compiled it all into a set totaling nearly ten hours.¹ The work didn’t need to be new; just what we thought might best represent our abilities/style(s), and/or perhaps what we were especially pleased with. The set premiered in late January. I compiled the four videos into a playlist, although you can also access them individually: here (1), here (2), here (3), and here (4). …

There has been a remarkable increase in the attention paid to the UFO issue over the past several months. The New Yorker, for instance, published an enormous piece entitled “How the Pentagon Started Taking UFOs Seriously”; 60 Minutes ran a segment reviewing generally the same reports and persons, and which is now in the top five of their most-viewed YouTube videos; Russell Brand recorded a monologue, asking whether this all was an impending “paradigm shift” or a “distraction”; etc., etc. Algorithms can, and are designed to, give us an incorrect sense of just how prevalent, or important, our (supposed) interests…

Before writing a fuller continuation of my previous essay on architectural criticism, I’m inserting a mini-essay that focuses on a particular piece of criticism. Let me be clear: I don’t see Kate Wagner, the person behind @mcmansionhell, as an enemy; I’m just using one of her articles as an example because I had, in my essay, already linked an image from an article of hers, and I’d rather elaborate on what I mean when I write “…a vapid buildup to a politically convenient takeaway” than bring in an entirely different item. Wagner, in my view, represents a sort of destabilizing…

Last year, I began reacquainting myself with interests which once had intensely excited my imagination and had afterwards been pushed so far aside that it was as if they’d never been. Two of these were cryptids and UFOs. When I last visited Michigan and went through several boxes of belongings I left behind before moving out of state, I found and brought back a book entitled Bigfoot and Other Legendary Creatures. It’s a short book, less than sixty pages. Each chapter is a fictitious account of a cryptid followed by some italicized paragraphs that give a brief historical context for…

One of the special and primary challenges to architectural criticism is that it is addressing something with public and private, artistic and functional, attributes. The degree to which these attributes may be formulated varies, but their dualities are ever-present. What can often arise is a kind of criticism which is expressing a scopophilic relationship between author and subject wherein one fails to appreciate a bigger, public, and more interactive picture. One might pass by a housing complex each day and find it unbearably dreary, yet to speak of it as such and leave it at that does not account for…

Despite the place and import accorded to text in social media, it is clear that the image, static and animated, is primary. If social media is an enormous roiling vat of various cultures with more visible monocultures glazed on the surface, and if our current social paradigms are defined by the ceaseless manufacture and attainment of goods, its commodities are then imagistic, and its phenomenological thrusts have magnified and appealed to the gaze as human beings’ most central sensory function. Thus, the explosive popularity of outlets such as Instagram and TikTok. We are long overdue for a narrowing in on…

We appear to have a relatively recent, popular, and liberal notion of pornography as healthy media. The opinion goes that the issue with pornography is not necessarily its content, accessibility, or economics, but the consumer’s maintenance of time spent with it. In other words, pornography isn’t the problem — addiction is. I am increasingly unconvinced by this position, especially when we have seen popular conflations of arguments for the civil protections of sex workers and arguments for the intrinsic healthiness of the work itself, moreover with no parameters set for one’s induction into that line of work. Perhaps this is…

When examining the “joke” of Femboy Hooters, one must first realize that it is really not much of a joke at all. If there is a joke, it’s that the very idea — a restaurant chain staffed by boys ostensibly only recognizable as such for their flat chests and pants-bulges — can only ever be an idea. Desire remains at the core of it, a desire perhaps all the more smitten because what it chases is imaginal. What is the character of the desire, though? We are not all that far from the response to Amy Brown’s handling of Wendy’s…

It is often the case with a meme that what is new is not the idea, but the visuals, the signifiers, by which that idea is expressed. The Karen meme fits into the phenomenon of inventions made in order to anger the creator, with the secondary intent of sharing this invention so that a kind of collective irritation occurs. After all, the more traction a meme gets, the more power it acquires; and the more power it acquires, the more it integrates with the fabric of reality. …

Thoughts Thought While Walks Walked

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